Skip to main content

The Literacy Council of Alaska helps immigrants in Fairbanks find their way to work, success, and citizenship.

“In the borough there are over 10 thousand people who don’t speak English as their first language. That’s over 10 percent of our population,” explained Mike Kolasa, the council’s executive director, adding, “Last year we had 175 English language learners students.”

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

About

David James is an Alaskan author and literary critic whose work has been published by the Anchorage Daily News, Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, Anchorage Press, Alaska Dispatch News, Alaska Pulse, Alaska Magazine, and Ester Republic. He is editing a forthcoming anthology of Alaska writing.
Kendell Macomber discusses aerial dancing,which she practices and teaches in Fairbanks, and her pathway into the Fairbanks professional dancing world, where she is a prominent contributor. One day I saw aerialists, and I said, that’s the next level; I have to do that. So I got up in the air and haven’t looked back.” Read more here .
I went for a hike . I got wet. I got grumpy. I got to have a beer at the end. "After pitching our tent I wrapped myself in every piece of dry clothing I had (dry bags, the miners didn’t have those either) and hid under the roof of the large, new, open-air structure that Park Service has built there, drinking coffee and telling anyone who crossed my path that if I ever leave Alaska, I’m moving to the desert."