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A new book explores the brief flowering of the white fox fur trade during the early twentieth century in the Western Arctic, from Canada to Siberia. It's a far reaching economic, cultural, and ecological account of a period in Alaskan, Canadian, and Russo-Soviet history that tends to be overlooked, despite the boom times it created.

"The impact in the north was immense. As traders moved in and established posts and bartered for pelts, Native peoples abandoned traditional subsistence economies and diets in favor of the goods and foodstuffs they could acquire from traders. The traditional means by which they had long thrived in such a harsh environment gave way as villages centered around trading posts, missions and schools replaced the migratory lifestyle that Arctic survival had always demanded."

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David James is an Alaskan author and literary critic whose work has been published by the Anchorage Daily News, Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, Anchorage Press, Alaska Dispatch News, and Ester Republic. He is editing a forthcoming anthology of Alaska writing.


Kendell Macomber discusses aerial dancing,which she practices and teaches in Fairbanks, and her pathway into the Fairbanks professional dancing world, where she is a prominent contributor.

One day I saw aerialists, and I said, that’s the next level; I have to do that. So I got up in the air and haven’t looked back.”

Read more here.
This year Fairbanks and the Russian Siberian city of Yakutsk are celebrating thirty years since the first meeting that led to a longstanding sister city relationship. To mark the occasion, Albert Semenov, Chairman of the Yakutsk City Council, paid a visit to Fairbanks.

“This year is the anniversary of the sister city relationship between Fairbanks and Yakutsk. And we don’t want to lose this friendship between people, not between politicians, not between governments, but between people," Semenov said.

Read more here.