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David James is an Alaskan author and literary critic whose work has been published by the Anchorage Daily News, Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, Alaska Dispatch News, and Ester Republic. He is editing a forthcoming anthology of Alaska writing.


Recent posts
The Literacy Council of Alaska helps immigrants in Fairbanks find their way to work, success, and citizenship.
“In the borough there are over 10 thousand people who don’t speak English as their first language. That’s over 10 percent of our population,” explained Mike Kolasa, the council’s executive director, adding, “Last year we had 175 English language learners students.”
A winding path brought Chidozie Menakaya from Lagos, Nigeria, to Fairbanks, Alaska. The latest installment in "Becoming Alaskan."
When I landed back in Fairbanks and walked through those airport doors, I was relieved,” recalled Chidozie Menakaya after returning to Alaska from Lagos, Nigeria. “I thought, ‘What does that mean if Fairbanks gives me relief?’” Then he broke out laughing.

An Inupiaq photographer brings the world face-to-face with Alaska's northernmost residents.
"Since 2015 he has been operating a website called "I am Inuit" where he presents photographs of Inuit people from across the western and northern regions of Alaska, along with short quotes where they offer thoughts on their lives. It's akin to the popular Facebook page "Humans of New York," but focused on the Native people of far-flung Alaska."
If someone had told me when I was twenty that in my fifties I would get paid to read and review a collection of mostly 1950s comic book stories about marijuana, I would have laughed out loud. But here we are.
“The lesson gleaned by young readers who would have encountered these comics – most published in the decade following World War II – is that smoking that first joint leads inevitably to insanity, violent crime, heroin addiction and murder, although nothing is mentioned about getting the munchies.”
A new book examines how sea otters came back from the brink of extinction.
"Foremost among the factors that saved the species, McLeish admits, is that humans find the animals irresistibly cute."

Igor Tashkovski, an enthusiastic traveler and student from Macedonia spending his second summer in Fairbanks, describes the ups and downs of being a temporary resident with a J1, or short-term work and travel visa. In his case it means working four jobs, but he gets to be in Alaska and see other places in America as well. The latest installment in the series Becoming Alaskan.
“For the three months I am here, although I spend most of my time at work, we went rafting at Denali,” he said. “Now we’re going to go to the zipline in Denali. We visited the glaciers at Valdez. We went to Angel Rocks a few times for a hike. We’re going to take the flightseeing plane to Denali. And before I say goodbye to Alaska, I will visit Anchorage and the Matanuska Glacier.”